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Clay Ornaments (Samples)

I know for a fact that ALL of us are extremely busy nowadays simply because of Christmas.

I know also that ALL of us are dealing with personal worries and problems in our lives.

I know very well that we ALL have pending projects that only time can tell when each projects be done.

In my case, my list is endless and whenever I sit in my craft room just staring at my list already tires me hahahahahhaahahahahahahha. Sometimes I wonder if I will ever be able to accomplish all on my list hahahahahaha. It's not the same anymore as last year when time is mine and mine alone when the house is empty. This year I have to divide my time but the heck with time management - it doesn't work for me hahahahahaha.

This clay ornament project is not on my list but since I got overwhelmed with my pending list, I rebelled! hahahahahahhahahahahahaha

Playing with clay is not my first time ... if you remember what i did for my DMIL's birthday give-a-ways http://scrapbookingwithjerosha.blogspot.com/2009/03/stamping-on-clay.html

This time I grabbed few of my big rubber stamps plus some cookie cutters and metallic paints. I used a paper clay so it will be lightweight coz I'm not sure if I will use it on my cards or make some more and hang in our Christmas tree. Using a paper clay that is really light as a paper, I find it unmanageable when using a clay machine. So, I ended up using a clay roller which is ssssssssooooooo much better.

I love the embossed designs but my favorite shape is the mother and father shape coz it symbolizes my mom and dad who have been resting int he arms of our Lord for more than a decade now. Joseph's favorite are the Christmas tree and the reindeer coz it sparkles after adding glitters. DH's fave are the round ones coz he likes the intricacy of the impressions.

Now, which is your fave?
Here's to show you an idea how I made these ornaments .....
 My messy craft desk with the tools needed

The lightweight paper clay ... cookie cutters ... and basic tools.  Flatten the clay then make an impression using your preferred rubber stamps then cut using cookie cutters.

The rubber stamps i chose for this project

Mom and dad

The tree, reindeer, and heart

 
The usual shape of ornament - round




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46th card for Christmas 2010

NOEL

Contemporary English dictionaries define the word “noel” (also spelled “nowel” or “nowell”) as a cry of joy associated with the celebration of Christmas. In past eras English speakers also used the word to refer to the feast of Christmas itself. This usage never faded in the French language, where the word Noël still means Christmas, or, when spelled without a capital “n,” means “Christmas carol.”  Although the English word “noel” is now considered somewhat obsolete, a number of traditional Christmas carols retain this old expression.


Materials Used:

CEB . Floral Fantasy
Crystal Beads
Sentiment by Slojd-Detaljer
Bow from Thailand
Cartridge : Joys of the Season
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45th Card for Christmas 2010

Snowman

According to Wikipedia, A snowman is an anthropomorphic snow sculpture. They are customarily built by children as part of a family project in celebration of winter. In some cases, participants in winter festivals will build large numbers of snowmen. Because a snowman is situation-specific, it is a good example of popular installation art.


Materials Used:
CEB : large Snowflakes from the Winter Bundle
Snowflakes Sequins
Sentiment unknown
Embossing powder
Cartridge : A Child's Year
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44th Card for Christmas 2010

Robin

The robin appears on Christmas cards, ornaments, and other Christmas decorations. No one seems to know, however, just how the bird became a Christmas symbol. British and Irish folklore links the robin with the wren, another Christmas bird.  Past folk beliefs assigned magical qualities and near sacred status to both birds.

According to various legends, one of these sacred birds once performed a heroic feat for humankind. Old tales from various parts of Europe lauded either the wren or the robin as the original fire-fetcher, the creature who delivered the first flames to humankind. In addition, English folklore assigned supernatural abilities to the robin. A
fairly widespread belief credited the robin with a foreknowledge of death and illness. According to these beliefs, a robin tapping on the window or flying in or about the house meant that death, disease, or some other misfortune would visit the family. Along similar lines, English folklore also claimed that both the robin and wren pitied the dead. According to this belief, the two birds often covered the lifeless bodies of whatever dead creatures they encountered in the woods with moss or leaves. These gestures of compassion supported their
reputation as kindly, holy creatures.



Materials used:

CEB : Cardinal Snow
Sentiment unknown
Crystal Beads
Snowflake Sequins
Cartridge : Joys of the Season
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43rd Card for Christmas 2010

Paradise Tree

Few people today would recognize a fir tree decorated only with red apples and white, circular wafers as a paradise tree. The paradise tree developed as a prop for the paradise play, a medieval European mystery
play performed around Christmas time. Indeed, with its early historical connection to the Christmas season, the paradise tree may well have been the forerunner of the Christmas tree.


Materials used:

CEB : Divine Swirls
Fiskars Star punch
Crystal Beads
Sentiment - unknown
MS Embossed Stars Border Punch
Cartridge : A Child's Year
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42nd Card for Christmas 2010

Christmas Wreaths

Americans recognize the evergreen wreath as a Christmas symbol.  Many people hang them on their front doors at Christmas time or display them in other parts of the house. No one seems to know the exact history of this custom. Some speculate that the front door wreath evolved out of the older, German Advent wreath. Others
suppose it to be an old Irish custom.

The Bible also makes frequent mention of wreaths, usually associating them with joy, triumph, and honor. As Christianity developed its own symbolic code, it turned the laurel wreath into a sign of the attainment of salvation. In more general terms, the wreath represents the same thing as the circle, often interpreted as a symbol of
eternity.


Materials Used:

CEB . Floral Fantasy
Crystal Beads
Sentiment by Slojd-Detaljer
Bow from Thailand
Cartridge : Joys of the Season
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41st Card for Christmas 2010

St. Nicholas

St. Nicholas lived in the late third and early fourth centuries.Very little is known about his life. By the Middle Ages, however, he had become one of Europe’s most venerated non-biblical saints. In France and Germany more than two thousand churches carry the saint’s name, bearing silent testimony to the intensity of past devotions. St. Nicholas was the Christmas season gift bringer in parts of northern Europe. His legend and the customs surrounding it traveled to America with European immigrants. In the United States St. Nicholas was transformed into Santa Claus. His new American name evolved from his old Dutch name, Sinterklass. Although Nicholas’s popularity has declined considerably since medieval times, some Europeans still celebrate his feast day, which falls on December 6.



Materials Used:

CEB : Script Texture, Plum Blossoms from the Asian bundle, and Japanese Scales also from the Asian bundle
Snowflakes sequins
Sentiment by Slojd-Detaljer
MS Train border punch
Panduro Christmas band
Crystal Beads
Cartridge : A Child's Year
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40th Card for Christmas 2010

Advent Candle

A number of different Advent customs require the lighting of candles.  Some writers believe that the use of candles during Advent may have been adopted from the fires and lights that illuminated pre-Christian midwinter festivals. Before the widespread use of electric lighting, the twinkling candles not only served to dispel the gloom of the long winter nights, but also represented the hope of light and life to come. In Christian terms, the flame of the Advent candle represents the coming of Jesus, “the light of the world” (John 8:12).


Materials Used:

CEB _ love bundle
Sentiment by Slojd-Detaljer
Crystal beads
SU photo Corner Punch
Cartridge : Nursery Rhymes
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39th Card for Christmas 2010

Origin of Christmas Tree

No one can confirm the exact origin of the Christmas tree. Some writers base their explanation of the Christmas tree on the theory that in ancient times the pagan peoples of northern Europe revered trees. They propose that the venerable pagan symbol of the tree survived the transition to Christianity by attaching itself to the Christian
midwinter holiday, Christmas. Little solid historical evidence exists to support this viewpoint, however. Others believe that the ancient Roman custom of decorating homes and temples with greenery during Kalends survived for centuries, eventually inspiring the people of the north to decorate their homes with small evergreen trees
at that time of year. Still others view the Christmas pyramid as the ancestor of the Christmas tree.


Materials used:

CEB : Swiss Dots and Oriental Weave from the Asian Bundle
Sentiment by Slojd and Detaljer
Crystal beads
Snowflake sequins
Reindeer from thailand
Christmas Noel Cartridge
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38th Card for Christmas 2010

Annunciation

Annunciation means “announcement.” When spelled with a capital “A,” the word refers to the announcement made by Gabriel, God’s messenger angel, to the Virgin Mary, telling her that she would bear a son by the Holy Spirit whom she should call Jesus (Luke 1:26-28).  By the early Middle Ages the Church had established a feast day to commemorate this angelic announcement.


Materials Used:

CEF: Flurries - Winter Bundle
Sentiment by Slojd-Detaljer
Crystal Beads
Foils
Cartridge : Christmas Noel
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37th Card for Christmas 2010

Kris Kringle

In parts of Germany, Switzerland, and Austria the Christkindel or Christkind brings children their Christmas gifts. Christkindel means “Christ child” in German. Some people understand the Christ Child to be the child Jesus; others view the Christ Child as an angel, who appears as a young girl with golden wings, long blond hair, and flowing robes.


This is one card that is not included in my items for sale this Yuletide Season.  Why?  The ribbon I used belongs to my mom and one of the things I will treasure are her collections.  She was a great artist/crafter in her own way and one of the things she collected were pretty ribbons. 
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36th Card for Christmas 2010

ANGELS

With so many angels involved in orchestrating the events surrounding Jesus’ birth, it is no wonder that they became a symbol of the Christmas holiday. Today’s Christmas angels frequently appear as winged human beings in flowing white robes with somewhat feminine faces and haloes. This image evolved over the course of two millennia.

The very first Christian depictions of angels date back to the time of the Roman Empire. Early Christian paintings of angels rendered them as ordinary men rather than as winged, spiritual beings. Some artists, however, garbed their angels in white robes, resembling a Roman senator’s toga, in order to symbolize their power and dignity. The first winged angels appeared in the fourth century. Some scholars believe that early Christian artists patterned the image of winged angels after the Greek goddess Nike, the winged, female spirit of victory. Others trace this image back even further to winged spirits associated with the religion of ancient Babylon. By the fifth century Christian artists from the Byzantine Empire began to depict angels with a disk of light, called a nimbus, behind their heads. This nimbus, or halo, signifies holiness, purity, and spiritual power.

In medieval times most western European artists portrayed angels as masculine in face and form. This trend reversed itself from the fourteenth to the sixteenth centuries. After that time, western European angels acquired softer, more feminine, or androgynous, looks. Sometimes they appeared as chubby children or toddlers. Artists often depicted angels with harps or other musical instruments. These emblems signify what some consider to be the primary occupation of angels—praising God.


Don't ask me the brand of the stamped image coz I really have no idea :(  I used Spica pens for the hair, metallic pens for the trumpet and the inner part of the sleeves then simply stickles for the wings and the robe.  Yup, thick foils were used as background and embossed with cuttlebug embossing folders.
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35th Card for Christmas 2010

Church Bells


As Christianity spread throughout Europe, Christian leaders slowly began to adapt bell-ringing traditions to Christian worship. Like the Romans, they used bells as a means of making public announcements. Since they wanted these announcements to carry over longer distances, they began casting large bells in addition to the smaller hand-held bells known since ancient times. They mounted these larger bells in high places and sounded them by the pulling of ropes or other devices. In early medieval times monasteries began ringing  bells to announce the start of religious services. By the tenth century churches throughout Europe, from cathedrals to tiny rural chapels, were equipped with bells for the same purpose.


Noticed some strangeness with the bells?  This is one of the moments when I tried using embossing creme.  Although it did not all puff I still love the effect.  The paper roses were done with the help of Sizzix 3D flower dies and the music sheet as the background was bought at CCHobby.  I also used stickles =)
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34th Card for Christmas 2010

Midnight Mass on Christmas Season

The Roman Catholic Church honors Christmas with three separate masses, each with its own distinctive liturgy. The first of these masses takes place in the middle of the night on Christmas Eve and is called Midnight Mass. In Spanish-speaking countries, Midnight Mass is known as the Misa de Gallo, or the rooster’s mass.

The first Christmas masses were celebrated at St. Peter’s Basilica in Rome on Christmas morning. In the fifth century Roman officials added another mass to be celebrated in the middle of the night. Rules in effect from about 400 to 1200 A.D. prescribed that this mass be held ad galli cantum, that is, when the rooster crows. Roosters begin to crow at about three in the morning. Eventually, however, the scheduling of the mass shifted to midnight. Perhaps the popular belief that Jesus was born at midnight influenced this shift.


Yes that's right ... I used JustRite Stamp and embossed with gold powder.  The foil was embossed using cuttlebug ebossing folder then I just added glittered self-adhesive fabric tape and a Christmas woody =)
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33rd Card for Christmas 2010

Merry

In contemporary English the word “merry” means “jolly,” “cheerful,” “lively,” or “happy.” Few people realize, however, that it once meant something slightly different. At the time the English coined the phrase “Merry Christmas,” merry meant “pleasant,” “delightful,” or “joyful.” Thus, at that time, the well-known phrase “merry England” did not mean “jolly England,” but rather “pleasant” or “delightful” England. When used to describe a holiday, the word “merry” signaled that it was a time of festivity or rejoicing.


This is one of the bad card day for me.  I'm not happy and satisfied with card but my son likes it very much.  I guess having my son as my #1 fan soars my confidence hahahahahahhahaha.  One thing that makes me smile when I look at this card is doily laced punched bottom border.  The scrunched flower and  the leaves I have made and you may see the tutorial under Flower Making category.  The butterfly is just a cutie I found while I was at the mall hehehehhehehehehehehe.  The crystal beads and flowers are from Panduro.
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32nd Card for Christmas 2010

The Old Christmas Day ....

When Pope Gregory XIII established the Gregorian calendar in 1582, he ushered in an era in which the people of Europe disagreed on what day it was. As a result, they celebrated Christmas on different days. Before the Gregorian reform Europe had adhered to the Julian calendar, which was a full ten days behind the newly instituted Gregorian calendar. Some nations and churches refused to adopt the Gregorian reforms. In these lands people continued to celebrate Christmas on December 25, but did so according to the Julian calendar. Their celebrations fell on January 5 according to the new Gregorian calendar. In past eras the English sometimes referred to January 5 or 6 as “Old Christmas Day.”


I played with some leftover foils and cardstock and used Argyle cuttlebug embossing folder to add texture.  Took my Poinsettia sizzix die and used the middle portion after embossing with swiss dots folder then added crystal beads on the image.  The paper roses was done using Sizzix 3D flower dies.  I decided not to color the owls coz the background is already festive and my aim is to make sure that everything pops-out with one look.  You might be wondering about the eyes -  I took 3 pairs from my unusual eye collection and it really made this card cute. 
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31st Card for Christmas 2010

Carols on Yuletide Season

Why are these traditional Christmas songs called “carols,” anyway?  Some scholars trace the English word “carol” all the way back to the ancient Greek word coros. In ancient Greek drama the coros, or “chorus,” appeared from time to time during the play singing commentaries on the plot and often dancing as well. By the late Middle Ages, the word “carol” had come to mean singing and dancing in a circle, as children do when singing “Ring Around the Rosy.” In the Middle Ages people caroled on many different occasions. By the sixteenth century, however, this musical genre had acquired a special association with the Christmas season, while its earlier association with dance was fading away.



Basically I embossed the thick foils using cuttlebug embossing folders the colored my Bratz digital image with copic markers then stamped a sentiment and added a large star.
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Anniversary Greetings to Orlis!

Oh my golly a great friend here at Multiply is celebrating her 5th year anniversary with a blast.  I'm so happy to have her as one of my friends and she surely creates lots of beautiful things eversince I have known her.


CONGRATULATIONS to you Orlis and cheers!  Wishing that we will stay friends as long as we live =)


Orlis has a simple request and that i say something about my world of crafting and here goes .....



1.  Crafting is not new to me coz I grew up in an artistic / creative parents.  While I was a little girl I was already amazed on color mediums and I always have that in my bag and bedroom.  With that being said, in college, my theses was textile designing and my designs were all colorful to the point that one big textile firm bought all my designs.


2.   I started expanding my craft  ..... and crafting seriously when I gave birth to my son last 2003.  When I say serious it means addiction hahahhahahhaha.  Living in a foreign land and not knowing a lot of people I opted to find something that will divert my mind from longingness back home to the Philippines.  That addiction grew really big and from that day forward my day is not complete without crafting.  It actually depresses me when I don't do crafting at all.


3.  I'm not really into cardmaking but once in a while I create few.  I'm more comfortable in creating unique things like recycling or something that needs altering and concocting a craft recipe.


4.  My craft room is small and every corner and nook is well occupated by craft materials and tools that I have an extension craft room at the basement.  Anything to do with paper crafting it's in my main craft room ... jewelry making, all kinds of needleworks and sewing, painting, altering are all being done at the basement.


5.  I'm one person when having a new tool like Gypsy, Cricut Expression, etc, is slow to act.  I use it when I have the urge and usually it will take months before I even try it hahahhahahahaha.  As of this writing, my gypsy is nearly a year older but have not been totally abused but as for my Cricut oh well it has been used and used and used only after a year of staring at it hehehehehehehhehehe =)


6.  I don't copy anybody's work coz for me that is a mortal sin in the world of crafting.  One can only be inspired and the execution is up to you.  It disgust me when I hear some crafters who just literally copy somebody's work!!!! It makes me so sad when someone would copy my work or be inspired with my creations without proper accreditation.  Usch!  making it look like and claiming it's your own idea but actually not repels me!!!!!  For me such person is not a crafter at all!


7.  I'm raising a son who is very creative in his own way and it makes my day complete when I see his artworks.  One thing he is so great with is art journaling and wishing I can do the same hahahahahahahah.

8.  I was once a cross-stitcher but gave it up when my dad died.  Every cross-stitch project  I did has a story to tell and to this day I have no guts to post any of it coz by just typing down the story behind on each project really makes me cry most of the time. 

9.  Jewelry making I have done that a long time ago together with my mom.  We would always create a jewelry set to match our clothes especially when I have a party to attend to.  I have given up such craft after my mom died and it's only this year ... this festive season that I'm making beaded accessories in honor of my mom =)

10.  People who come to my site and leave love and kindness makes me feel complete.  For me it surely is a sign of great respect.  Usually those who drop by in any of my craft sitesand never leave a message at all are usually those who copy hahahahahahahahhaahhahahahahahahahahahahahaha.  May God bless them with true meaning of creativity =)

Some of you really know me very well but I still would like to throw a question to all of you ....
What do you think I am best with when we talk about my crafting?
Love you guys!
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Victorian / Vintage Inspired Christmas Ornaments

Whew! Finally I'm done with this project and has been packed and no longer in my hands for weeks now. 
These victorian inspired paper ornaments were handmade with love for my secret craft partner somewhere around the globe.  Crossing my fingers that soon she will have these items plus other surprise goodies I included in her box.  Praying that she will love what i made for her and treasure it forever =)





Materials Used:

ATC card base bought in UK
Music Sheet Cardstock by CCHobby
Ranger Distress Ink pad - Vintage Photo
Crystal Beads in assorted colors by Slojd-Detaljer
Victorian Cut-outs by Panduro
Tulle in assorted colors by Kreativ Pyssel
Different bands - leftovers
JustRite Stamps for the stamped words
Snowflake Gold Eyelets and lain Eyelets
Cake Bottom papers
My very own assembled flowers
My very own homemade glimmer mist
SU tab punch
all natural rope bought in a hardware store









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30th Card for Christmas 2010

Christmas Symbols

Over the centuries many Christmas symbols have emerged from the lore, legends, and customs surrounding Christmas. The more familiar of these symbols include Christmas trees, stars, Nativity scenes, Advent calendars, candy canes, angels, bells, cherry trees, Christmas cards, farolitos, holly, ivy, gifts, mistletoe, poinsettias, plum pudding, reindeer, robins, and wreaths. Folk figures such as Santa Claus, La Befana, Father Christmas, Grandfather Frost, the Jultomten, the Snow Maiden, the Weihnachtsmann, and the Yule goat also
serve as symbols of the holiday.


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29th Card for Christmas 2010

Rudolf the Red nose Reindeer

In the early twentieth century an ordinary department store worker added a new reindeer to Santa’s team. Robert L. May, an employee at Montgomery Ward, wrote a poem entitled “Rudolph the Red-Nosed Reindeer” in 1939. The store printed the poem and distributed it to children as a sales gimmick.

Written to appeal to children, the poem tells the story of a young reindeer who was rejected by his playmates for being different. The rejected youth, named Rudolph, had a large, shiny, red nose while all the other reindeers had small black noses. One very misty Christmas Eve, however, Santa discovers that the shiny red nose gives off
enough light to help him sail safely through the murky night skies. Once the other reindeer realize Rudolph’s nose is a valuable asset they befriend the once lonely youngster.

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28th Card for Christmas 2010

Bells On Christmas

Today fewer churches carry out the old Christmas tradition of bell ringing, and the folklore surrounding bells has been largely forgotten. Nevertheless, the public imagination still links bells with Christmas. A number of well-known Christmas poems and Christmas carols depict pealing or jingling bells as joyful emblems of the holiday. In addition, bells appear as symbols of the holiday on many Christmas decorations. Finally,  representatives of charitable causes seeking donations at Christmas time often announce their presence
on street corners by ringing hand-held bells.



 The bells image was created using embossing creme and stencil.  This is how it looks like when I tried embossing creme for the very first time - it did not puff at all! :(
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27th Card for Christmas 2010

Santa - Confusion Over Names

By the time the next major contributor to the gift bringer’s mythology came upon the scene, the St. Nicholas figure popularized by Moore and Irving had become known as Santa Claus. The Dutch phrase for St. Nicholas is Sinterklaas. Apparently, American English speakers found this word troublesome. Scholars have uncovered a
number of early American renditions of the good saint’s name, including “St. Aclaus,” “St. Iclaus,” “Santeclaw,” “Sancte Klaas,” “St. Claas,” and “St. a claus.” Eventually, Americans settled on “Santa Claus,” a name which, for most English speakers, obscured the gift giver’s link back to one of Europe’s most popular saints.

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26th Card for Christmas 2010

MERRY


In contemporary English the word “merry” means “jolly,” “cheerful,” “lively,” or “happy.” Few people realize, however, that it once meant something slightly different. At the time the English coined the phrase “Merry Christmas,” merry meant “pleasant,” “delightful,” or “joyful.” Thus, at that time, the well-known phrase “merry England” did not mean “jolly England,” but rather “pleasant” or “delightful” England. When used to describe a holiday, the word “merry” signaled that it was a time of festivity or rejoicing.

In greeting one another with the phrase “Merry Christmas,” the English were wishing each other a festive and joyful holiday. The sixteenth-century English Christmas carol, “God Rest You Merry, Gentlemen,” offers another example of this usage. Contemporary English speakers often interpret the title of this song to mean something like
“God Rest You, Jolly Gentlemen.” In fact, the comma separating “merry” from “gentlemen” in the original phrase tells us that in this context “merry” does not function as an adjective describing the gentlemen in question. In the sixteenth century, “God Rest You Merry, Gentlemen” meant “God Rest You Joyfully, Gentlemen” or, as contemporary English speakers might be more likely to say, “God Keep You Joyous, Gentlemen”


Materials Used:

JustRite Christmas Stamps
Nestabilities - scallop and round
Piercing tool
Embossing Powder
Crystal Beads
Paper Roses with the help of Sizzix dies
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25th Card for Christmas 2010

Merry Christmas Around the World

Here’s how to say “Merry Christmas and Happy New Year” in languages
from around the world.
Afrikaans Geseknde Kersfees en ‘n Gelukkige Nuwe
Jaar
Brazilian Portuguese Boas Festas e Feliz Ano Novo
Bulgarian Vesela Koleda i Chestita Nova Godina
Catalan Bon Nadal i un Feliç Any Nou
Chinese (Cantonese) Sin Dan Fae Lok. Gung Hai Fat Choi.
Chinese (Mandarin) Shen Dan Kuai Le. Xin Nian Yu Kuai.
Croatian Sretan Bozic. Sretna Nova Godina.
Czech Stastne a Vesele Vanoce a Stastny Novy Rok
Danish Glaedig Jul Og Godt Nytår Gelukkige
Nieuwjaar
Dutch Vrolik Kerstfeest en een Gelukkig Nieuw
Jaar
Esperanto Felican Kirstnaskon Kaj Bonan Novjaron
Estonian Rõõmusaid Jõulupuhi ja Head Uut Aastat
Faeroese Gledhilig Jol Og Eydnurikt Nyggjar
Finnish Hyvaa Joulua ja Onnellista Uutta Vuotta
Flemish Zalig Kerstfeest en Gelukkig Nieuw Jaar
French Joyeux Nöel et Bonne Année
Gaelic (Scots) Nollaig Chridheil Agus Bliadhna Mhath Yr
German Fröhliche Weihnachten und ein Glückliches
Neues Jahr
Greek Kala Christougenna kai Evtichismenos o
Kainourious Chronos
Hausa Barka ka Kirsimatikuma Barka da Sabuwar
Shekara
Hawaiian Mele Kalikimaka Ame Hauoli Makahiki Hou
Hebrew Hag ha-Molad Sameah. Shanah Tovah.
Hungarian Boldog Karácsonyi Üennepeket Es Boldog
Ujévet
Icelandic Gledhileg Jol Og Farsflt Komandi Ar
Indonesian Selemat Hari Natal Dan Selamat Tahun Baru
Inupik (Eskimo) Jutdlime Pivdluarit Ukiortame Pivdluaritlo
Italian Buon Natale e Felice Anno Nuovo
Japanese Meri Kurisumasu Soshite Akemashite
Omedeto
Korean Sungtanul Chukaheyo. Sehae Bok Mani
Baduseyo.
Latin Natale Hilare et Annum Faustum
Latvian Priecigus Ziemsvetkus un Laimigu Jaungadu
Lithuanian Linksmu kaledugnenna. Laimingu Najuju
Metu.
Norwegian God Jul Og Godt Nytt År
Pennsylvania German En Frehlicher Grischtdaag un en Hallich Nei
Yaahr
Persian Krismas-e Shoma Mubarak. Sal-e no
Mobarak.
Polish Wesolych Swiat i Szczesliwego Nowego
Roku
Portuguese Feliz Natal e um Prospero Ano Novo
Romanian Craciun Fericit Si Un An Nou Fericit
Russian Vesëlogo Rozhdestva. Schastlivogo Novogo
Goda.
Serbian Hristos se Rodi. Srecna Nova Godina.
Slovak Vesele Vianoce i na Ndravie v Novom Roku
Slovenian Vesele Bozicne Praznike in Srecno Novo
Leto
Spanish Feliz Navidad y Próspero Año Nuevo
Swedish God Jul Och Ett Gott Nytt År
Tagalog Maligayang Paskó. Maligayang Bagong Taon.
Turkish Neseli Noel. Mutlu Yilbasi.
Vietnamese Chuc Mung Giang Sinh. Chuc Mung Nam
Moi.
Yiddish Fraylekhn Krimes. A Git Yor.
Yoruba E Ku Odun, e Ku Iye’dun


For the word Merry Christmas I used embossing Creme for the 2nd time.  It did not puff so much for my 2nd try but I still like how it turned out.
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24th Card for Christmas 2010

Ornaments

Snow-covered evergreens standing in the woods are merely trees. Once decorated, they become Christmas trees. Over the centuries people have adorned their Christmas trees with many different kinds of objects. The very earliest ornaments tended to recall the religious significance of the holiday. At one point people decorated their Christmas trees with good things to eat and gifts for one another. In more recent times Christmas ornaments have served primarily as pretty decorations for the tree.

Sometime around 1870 a new fad in Christmas tree decorations began. Instead of decorating the tree with gifts and things to eat, people began to buy commercially made decorations designed solely for use as ornaments. Most of these early commercial ornaments came from Germany.  Early German designers fashioned novel ornaments out of tin and wax. In the city of Dresden, artisans specialized in making ornaments
out of embossed and painted cardboard. Only some of their designs featured Christmas symbols. They also crafted numerous ornaments shaped like fish, birds, ordinary and exotic animals, or recent inventions, such as the steamship and the motor car. In 1878 artisans from Nuremberg devised thin strips of silver foil that could be strewn over the tree’s branches like icicles. They called the thin strips engelshaar, which means “angels’ hair,” but we know them today as “tinsel.” German printers also adopted recently invented color-printing
techniques to turn out thousands of color illustrations of Christmas themes. Popular designs included angels, St. Nicholas, and the Weihnachtsmann. People collected especially pretty images and began to use them to ornament their Christmas trees and, sometimes, even to decorate their Christmas cookies.


Materials Used:

CEF - Asian Bundle: Lantersn
Stamp image - unknown
Sentiment stamp - unknown
MS Edge punch - Picket Fence
Panduro printed cardstock
Crystal beads by slojd-detaljer

Copic Markers:
skin - E00, 35, 53 and R00
hair - E33, 35, 53
denims - B12, 45, 93
sweater - G000, G00, 21, YG63
shoes - warm grey 3 & 4 (promarkers)
ornaments - BV13, 63, VR02, 07, 16, G14 plus promarkers Apricot, Meadow Green, Cyan, and Agean
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23rd Card for Christmas 2010

GIFTS

Europeans have exchanged midwinter gifts with one another since ancient times. Until relatively recently, owever, most of these gifts traded hands around New Year’s Day rather than on Christmas Day. As Christmas became an increasingly important holiday, people began to exchange gifts on Christmas rather than on New Year’s Day.


The custom of exchanging Christmas gifts among friends and family became widespread during the nineteenth century. In this same era Europeans and Americans began to adopt the German Christmas tree. At the same time Santa Claus became a popular mythological figure associated with Christmas in the United States. Both of these innovations encouraged the growth of Christmas gift giving—the tree by providing a beautiful location to display the gifts, and Santa Claus by serving as a new Christmas gift bringer. Unlike the medieval New Year’s gift, or the English Christmas box, the nineteenthcentury Christmas gift circulated between family and friends and expressed the affection of the sender. Although charity had for centuries been a theme of Christmas celebrations, it became increasingly important in the nineteenth century. Charitable gifts linked Christmas gift giving with the spiritual celebration of the holiday. Finally, in the twentieth century many American companies adopted the custom of distributing Christmas bonuses to their workers at Christmas time. Reminiscent of the English
Christmas box, these gifts of cash rewarded employees for their hard work in the past year.

Julklapp
Another old tradition of Christmas gift giving comes from Sweden. The Swedes called these gifts Julklapp, which means “Christmas knock.” This name comes from an old Swedish custom whereby Christmas gift givers would knock on doors, toss in their gift, and run away. Recipients then tried to guess who had delivered the gifts. In addition, Julklapp usually arrived in some form of trick packaging. These surprise gifts added a dash of humor to the Christmas season.


Materials used:

CEF - Textile Texture
Stamp by Rubber Stampede (thanks Claire for this great stamp)
Grossgrain ribbon by Tilda
"God Jul" charm by CChobby
Crystal beads by slojd-detaljer

Copic Markers:
skin - E00, 95, 93 and R00
hair - R59 and promarker Maroon
blouse - R37 and promarker Berry Red
gift packs - R27, RV34, E04, BG05, G14 and 17, plus promarker Emerald
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22nd Card for Christmas 2010

Boy Bishop

In the Middle Ages the Christmas season offered a special delight to a few lucky boys. On December 28, Holy Innocents’ Day, religious communities, cathedrals, colleges, schools, and parish churches throughout Europe permitted an ordinary choirboy to take over the role of the local bishop. Known as the boy bishop, these kingsfor-a-day were enormously popular with the people, in spite of the reservations of some Church authorities. They wore episcopal robes and rings especially made for boys, led processions, officiated at services, preached sermons, made visitations, and received gifts. What’s more, the administrators of local cathedrals were  sometimes expected to entertain the boy bishop and his entourage in a manner befitting their assumed rank. These festivities came to an end around the sixteenth century, when Church and state officials finally prohibited
boy bishops. In some areas, however, the custom lingered on. One French diocese supported a boy bishop until 1721. In recent years some English cathedrals have revived the medieval custom of sponsoring a boy bishop at Christmas time.


Materials Used:

CEF winter bundle : tartan
CChobby ofr the cardstocks
Reindeer bought in Thailand
"God Jul" cahrm by CCHobby
SU photo corner punch
Stickles by YouDo - Iris yellow

Copic Markers:
skin - E00, 93, and R00
hair - E33, 35, 53
sweater - B12, 93, 95
scarf / cap - Y8, 11, 15
gloves / pants - YG11, 41 and promarker apple
boots - W5, C5, 7
ski - W1, promarkers agean and warm grey 3
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21st Card for Christmas 2010

White Christmas

“White Christmas” is the most popular Christmas song ever recorded. Written by Irving Berlin (1888-1989) and featured in the 1942 movie Holiday Inn, it soon inspired a large and loyal following. Bing Crosby (1904-1977), one of America’s most popular mid-century crooners, sang the tune in the motion picture and also recorded it as
a single. It sold so many copies that the die press used to imprint the records literally wore out. Crosby recorded the song again in 1947, once more in 1952—as part of the sound track for the movie White Christmas—and yet again in 1955. By 1968 listeners had snapped up 30 million copies of the song. For decades “White Christmas” reigned not only as the best-selling Christmas song ever recorded, but also as the best-selling single ever recorded. In 1997, pop star Elton John finally toppled this achievement with his musical tribute to Princess
Diana, “Candle in the Wind.”


CEF Winter Bundle - large snowflakes
Ribbon by IKEA
large clear beads by Panduro
Edwin on a Sleihg rubber stamp
Sentiment stamp - unknown
Ranger distress ink pads: milled lavander, chipped sapphire, and tumbled glass

Copic Markers:
skin - E00, 93, 95 and R00
hair - E33, 35, 53
winter overall - W1, 3, 5
hood / boots - B97
sole of boots - Warm Grey 3 (promarkers)
gloves / cap - B24, 45
sleigh - E43, 31
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20th Card for Christmas 2010

Legend of the Snow Maiden

Snegurochka is the Russian word for “Snow Maiden.” Many different versions of her tale can be heard across Russia. The outlines of the story remain the same, however. Once upon a time an old, peasant couple were watching their neighbors’ children romp in the snow. The couple had always wanted children of their own but had reached old age without having any. As they watched the youngsters play, their longing inspired them to build a little girl out of snow. They rolled, patted, and shaped the snow, creating the image of a beautiful little girl with long braids. She was so life-like that they spoke to her, beseeching her to come to life and live in their house as their own daughter. Moments later the snow girl seemed to breathe, then her lips and cheeks blushed pink, and her braids turned from white to golden blond. Their wish had come true! The girl told them that she had come from the land of winter to be their daughter. The astonished couple hugged the girl and took her home with them.

The Snow Maiden was cheerful and good as well as beautiful. Everyone loved her. The old couple took great joy in making a home for her and in watching her frolic with the other children. But as spring approached the Snow Maiden began to change. Little by little, she lost her good spirits and seemed to grow tired or ill. One day she announced that the time had come for her to return to the far north, to the land of winter. The couple begged her not to go. The old woman hugged her daughter tightly and felt drops of water on the surface
of the girl’s skin and clothes. This alarmed the old couple, but neither knew what to do. In a few minutes the Snow Maiden had melted away completely.

Her disappearance broke their hearts. They mourned for her throughout the spring and summer. They tried to shut their ears to the laughter of children playing in the sunshine, since it only reminded them of the sweet Snow Maiden. The old couple passed a gloomy autumn, and, soon, winter returned to the land. One evening, as the snow swirled around the eaves of their house, they heard a knock at the door. The sound struck fear into their hearts because they could not imagine who would visit them on such an evening. Soon they heard a familiar high-pitched voice cry, “Mama, Papa, open the door!  The winter snows have returned your daughter to you!” The old man flung open the door and there stood the smiling Snow Maiden. The old couple wept and embraced her. Just as before, the three of them passed a joyful winter together. As spring approached the old couple resigned themselves to the Snow Maiden’s disappearance. They did not grieve for her when she melted, though. They knew that the winter snow would return their Snegurochka to them next
year.


Materials Used:

CEF Winter Bundle - Flurries
Stamp by Slojd-detlajer
Colorful ribbon - freebie
Cardstocks by CCHobby
Crystal beads by slojd-detaljer
Spica pens

Copic Markers:
YR68, 02
B00, 05
BG09, 01
and promarker Apricot
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19th Card for Christmas 2010

Peace of Christmas

In past times people took the Peace of Christmas quite seriously. In old Norway the Peace of Christmas began on St. Thomas’s Day, December 21. So strong was the desire for harmony that appointed guards roved the towns to insure that peace reigned throughout the season. The penalties for violent crimes doubled during this period, adding extra incentive to comply with the seasonal declaration of peace.




Materials Used:

CEF - Joy and Cheer
CChobby for all the cardstocks
ranger distress ink pads: Frayed burlap and vintage photo
stickles . crystal
crystal beads by slojd-detaljer
Black embossing powder

Copic Markers:
B24, YG67, RV07, R37, E29 and promarker canary yellow
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18th Card for Christmas 2010

Shepherds

The Gospel according to Luke tells that an angel announced Jesus’ birth to some humble shepherds who were spending the night in a nearby field. Many Bible commentators have remarked that this incident shows that God’s favor rests with the poor, since they were the first to receive news of Christ’s birth. After receiving the angel’s visit, the shepherds journey to Bethlehem in order to pay homage to Jesus, the newborn king. They find
the Holy Family lodged in a stable. Since Mary had no crib, she laid the baby Jesus in a manger, or trough used to feed animals. Thus in Luke’s account of Jesus’ birth, the Holy Family lodges with the animals and is visited by shepherds.

The Gospel according to Matthew offers a different version of events (see also Gospel Accounts of Christmas). In that account, educated and well-to-do men from the East, the Magi, are the first to learn of Jesus’ birth. Matthew’s story implies that the Holy Family lives in Bethlehem. No shepherds appear in Matthew’s account, just as no Magi appear in Luke’s account.


Materials Used:

CEF - Winter Bundle : Flurries
Cardstocks by CCHobby
Stamp Image by Sarah Kay
Sentiment "'tis the season" - unknown
Grossgrain ribbon by Tilda
checkered bow bought in Thailand
Crystal beads by slojd-detaljer
Balck Embossing powder

Copic Markers :
skin- R00, E00, 93
B95, 93, 97
W-1, 3, 5
YG63
R22, 27, 29
E57
G21, 07
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17th Card for Christmas 2010

Wreaths

Americans recognize the evergreen wreath as a Christmas symbol. Many people hang them on their front doors at Christmas time or display them in other parts of the house. No one seems to know the exact history of this custom. Some speculate that the front door wreath evolved out of the older, German Advent wreath. Others suppose it to be an old Irish custom. The English word “wreath” comes from the old Anglo-Saxon verb writhan, meaning “to writhe” or “to twist.” Indeed, Christmas wreaths are made by bending or twisting branches of greenery into a circular shape.

Wreaths have served as powerful symbols for millennia. In ancient Greece and Rome wreaths of greenery worn as crowns sat on the brows of those believed to have won divine favor. Thus, wreaths adorned the heads of sacrificial animals, winners of athletic and artistic competitions, participants in religious festivals, and kings. The type of greenery used to make the wreath also sent a message. Winners of athletic and literary contests donned wreaths of laurel. Wreaths of ivy circled the brows of those honoring the wine god, Dionysus or Bacchus. Those whose achievements brought about military victories or peace wore wreaths of olive.



Materials Used:

CEF - Tim Holtz : Retro Circles
CCHobby for the plain colored cardstocks
Printed cardstock - leftover for short unknown hehehehehehe
Satin ribbons bought in Philippines
Sentiment "Merry & Bright" - unknown
Girl with Wreathe Stamp by - unknown
MS Edge punch - lace hearts
Black embossing powder

Copic Markers:
skin - E00, 93, 95, R00
hair - E33, 35, 53
dress / headband - YG11, 63, 95, R29, 59, and RV29
shoes - YG00, 23
Wreath - G02, 28, 94
ribbon /bow - Y17, 38
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Stylish Blogger Award for Me and I''m THANKFUL =)

What a great morning in this cold and snowy day when one receives an award.  The fact that it's called a "Stylish Blogger Award" makes my brain spin coz it denotes a lot of things.  Receiving this award from a superlicious crafter who happens to be a great friends and sister-like to me, Claire Langan, made me feel special.  She is my great idol when it comes to card-making and even scrapbooking coz her works are super-duper-awesome!


I'm forwarding this special award to fellow crafters who I think deserves it, too =)  If you have time to visit each of their blog you will surely be amazed on their creations.

But first I have to follow the simple instructions before I link the chosen sites ...
1. Thank and link back to the person who awarded you this
2. Share 8 things about yourself
3. Pay it forward to 8 bloggers that you have recently discovered
4. Contact those bloggers and tell them about their awards

To tell and share things about me is kind'a hard but will try it anyway ....

1.  Crafting is not new to me coz I grew up in an artistic / creative parents.  While I was a little girl I was already amazed on color mediums and I always have that in my bag and bedroom.  With that being said, in college, my theses was textile designing and my designs were all colorful to the point that one big textile firm bought my designs.

2.   I started expanding my craft  ..... and crafting seriously when I gave birth to my son last 2003.  When I say serious it means addiction hahahhahahhaha.  Living in a foreign land and not knowing a lot of people I opted to find something that will divert my mind from longingness back home to the Philippines.  That addiction grew really big and from that day forward my day is not complete without crafting.

3.  I'm not really into cardmaking but once in a while I create few.  I'm more comfortable in creating unique things like recycling or something that needs altering and concocting a craft recipe.

4.  My craft room is small and every corner and nook is well occupated by craft materials and tools that I have an extension craft room at the basement.  Anything to do with paper crafting it's in my main craft room ... jewelry making, all kinds of needleworks and sewing, painting, altering are all being done at the basement.

5.  I'm one person when having a new tool like Gypsy, Cricut Expression, etc, is slow to act.  I use it when I have the urge and usually it will take months before I even try it hahahhahahahaha.  As of this writing, my gypsy is nearly a year older but have not been totally abused but as for my Cricut oh well it has been used and used and used only after a year of staring at it hehehehehehehhehehe =)

6.  I don't copy anybody's work coz for me that is a mortal sin in the world of crafting.  One can only be inspired and the execution is up to you.  It disgust me when I hear some crafters who just literally copy somebody's work!!!! It makes me so sad when someone would copy my work or be inspired with without accreditation.  Usch!  making it look like and claiming it's your own idea but actually not repels me!!!!!  For me such person is not a crafter at all!

7.  I'm raising a son who is very creative in his own way and it makes my day complete when I see his artworks.  One thing he is so great with is art journaling and wishing I can do the same.

8.  People who come to my site and leave love and kindness makes me feel complete.  For me it surely is a sign of great respect.


Now, to choose 8 fellow crafters is also difficult coz I know a LOT of great crafters but without favoring anyone, I'm choosing anyway .... so will be back in a short while .....



4

Embossing Creme - A cool Tool!

A craft owner called me that she has new products that maybe I will be so interested.  Right after work I went straight to her shop and took a good look and yup did buy few stuffs like sets of acrylic VIVA stamps, bought all her twine huge rolls in different colors, stencils plus silver and gold embossing creme. I have no idea how to use it so she gave me a quick info on how to go about it. 

Yesterday evening while Joseph was busy using my computer I had the chance to try the embossing creme.  But let me tel you more about Joseph's drawing.  First he just wanted to watch dinosaur short clips from YouTube then after 30 minutes he was running and getting his colored pens .... took some white art paper from my drawer ... then he got busy.  I was to immersed with my play with the embossing creme that I forgot about him hahahahahhahaha.  Oh my what a surprise for me when I checked him out - he was just behind me actually hahahahahhahahahha.  He was busy drawing some monsters and so I immediately took some pics of such a wonderful moment.

He combined 2 monsters in his drawing and I really love the way it turned out =)  Here's his drawing moments ......


Now let's go back to my play with the ViVA embossing creme .....
I believe the technique here is to really apply lots of embossing creme before peeling off the stencil.  And then scrape off the excess from the stencil which will really be messy hehehehehehehhehe.  Too puff the image, one has to use a heating tool.  It reminds me of those puff pens I have and I was like a little girl with eyes all aglow when it's being heated and puff it goes.

My first few tries were not puffy enough until I got the right technique ... but still with few flaws.

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